Speech Events

Original

Original Oratory (OO)

Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and are generally persuasive in nature. The speech is delivered from memory.

Original Advocacy (OA)

Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and are generally persuasive in nature. This event is similar to Original Oratory; however, OA speeches generally target a more concrete issue with a legislative solution that may be enacted by Congress. The speech is delivered from memory.

Original Prose and Poetry (OPP)

The speaker creates an original work that consists of plays, stories, poems, essays or a combination. However, the performance of the piece is similar to Interpretation. Voice and movement techniques used in the Interpretation category are also used here.

Expository (EXPOS)

The speaker delivers a speech on any topic under the sun using posterboards and well-crafted visual aids, which are usually intended to provide humor, irony, or illustrate a topic. The speech has to be well written and should not fall into the same repetitive patterns of a book report, but most of the attention is focused on the visual aids.

Spontaneous

Impromptu (IMP)

Impromptu is a public speaking event where students have two minutes to select a topic, brainstorm their ideas, outline and deliver a five minute speech. The speech is given without notes and uses an introduction, body, and conclusion. The speech can be light-hearted or serious. It can be based upon prompts that range from nursery rhymes, current events, celebrities, organizations, and more.

International Extemporaneous (IX)

Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to international current events and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the Internet during preparation. Topics range from country-specific issues to regional concerns to foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.

National/Domestic Extemporaneous (NX/DX)

Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to current events in the United States and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the Internet during preparation. Topics range from political matters to economic concerns to U.S. foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.

Interpretation

Click on purple headers for video demonstrations

Dramatic Interpretation (DI)

Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. With a spotlight on character development and depth, this event focuses on the student’s ability to convey emotion through the use of a dramatic text. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance, and state the title and the author.

Humorous Interpretation (HI)

Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. Humorous Interpretation is designed to test a student’s comedic skills through script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.

Duo Interpretation (DUO)

Two competitors team up to deliver a ten-minute performance of a published play or story. Using off-stage focus, competitors convey emotion and environment through a variety of performance techniques focusing on the relationships and interactions between the characters. No props or costumes are used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the students to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.

Thematic Interpretation (TI)

Students creatively and poetically combine short stories, plays, articles, and/or other published words to convert an overall deeper social theme. Thematic Interpretation is designed to challenge the student’s understanding of a theme told through different points of view, as well as script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. The only Interp event where a prop (a small black binder) is used to represent scene and character changes. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the titles and the authors of the works used.

Oratorical Interpretation (OI)

The speaker selects a speech that was previously given to a public audience. The student is to deliver the speech as it might have been given to fulfill the purpose of the speech. OI speeches typically use facets of delivery from Interpretation during the performance. No notes are allowed and the speech must be memorized.